Spring Break Special: Sex and Violence

Posted on March 4, 2011

0


As the week is ending, the Mayor’s Health Line would like to wrap up our special with a look at the hazards of sex and violence that occur during spring break. As mentioned yesterday , alcohol plays a large role in spring break culture. Excessive drinking can then lead to other unfortunate circumstances surrounding sex and violence. During spring break, 50% of men and 40% of women claim to drink every night until they pass out (online schools). At this point, the risk of assault greatly increases. Take a look below at the Fox Morning Show special on Spring Break to hear real stories and comments on the dangers associated with sex and violence.

 

Part 1:


Part 2:

 

These videos give a look into the potential circumstances that can arise from too much drinking. Connect with Kids offers good advice for both parents and students to follow in order to descrease the risk of assault.

 

Students:

  • Don’t drink too much. Drinking makes it easier for a person to become either the victim or the perpetrator of a sexual assault.

  • Don’t allow yourself to be taken to an isolated location.

  • Use the buddy system. Don’t walk alone. Attend large parties with friends and leave with the same friends.

  • Watch out for “rape” drugs. Don’t leave a drink unattended. Don’t accept open drinks from strangers. If you start feeling odd, put the buddy system into action.

 

Parents:

  • Start early by discussing tough issues, including sexuality, violence and drug use.

  • Initiate conversations with your child.

  • Create an open environment for conversation.

  • Communicate your own values.

  • Listen to your child.

  • Try to be honest.

  • Be patient.

  • Use everyday opportunities to talk.

  • Talk about issues again and again.

 

We hope you have found this week’s Spring Break Special helpful. We hope that everyone uses these tips to have a safe and healthy week off of school. As always, for any questions or concerns you may call the Mayor’s Health Line at 617-534-5050.

Advertisements